Tuesday, April 26

Red-Headed Woodpecker

Red-Headed Woodpecker
Kenosha Wisconsin

The red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) is a small or medium-sized woodpecker from temperate North America. Their breeding habitat is open country across southern Canada and the eastern-central United States. The species is listed as Near Threatened by the IUCN.

The red-bellied woodpecker also has its most prominent red part of its plumage on the head, but it looks quite different in other respects.

The red-headed woodpecker was one of the many species originally described by Linnaeus in his 18th-century work Systema Naturae. The specific epithet is derived from the Ancient Greek words erythros 'red' and kephalos 'head'.
-wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights

Sunday, April 24

Red Bellied Woodpecker Doing A Bit Of House Work!

Lake Park, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The red-bellied woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) is a medium-sized woodpecker of the Picidae family. It breeds in southern Canada, northeastern Mexico, and the northeastern United States, ranging as far south as Florida and as far west as Texas. Its common name is somewhat misleading, as the most prominent red part of its plumage is on the head; the red-headed woodpecker, however, is another species that is a rather close relative but looks quite different.
It was first described in Linnaeus' Systema Naturae, as Picus carolinus. The type locality is given simply as "America septentrionalis" (North America).
-wiki

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reserved.

Tuesday, April 19

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal
Wisconsin

Cardinals, in the family Cardinalidae, are passerine birds found in North and South America. They are also known as cardinal-grosbeaks and cardinal-buntings. The South American cardinals in the genus Paroaria are placed in another family, the Thraupidae
They are robust, seed-eating birds with strong bills. The family ranges in size from the 12-cm (4.7-in), 11.5-g (0.40-oz) and up orange-breasted bunting to the 25-cm (9.8-in), 85-g (2.99-oz) black-headed saltator. They are typically associated with open woodland. The sexes usually have distinctive appearances. The northern cardinal type species was named by colonists for the male's red crest, reminiscent of a Catholic cardinal's biretta.

The "North American buntings" are known as such to distinguish them from buntings. The name "cardinal-grosbeak" can also apply to this family as a whole.
-wiki

(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights

Sunday, April 17

North Point Lighthouse

North Point Lighthouse,
Lake Park, Milwaukee Wisconsin

The North Point Light is a lighthouse located in Lake Park on the East Side of Milwaukee in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, United States.

The lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 as reference #84003732. It was also added to the Library of Congress Historic American Buildings Survey as survey HABS WI-358.

It replaced a previous Cream City brick lighthouse constructed in 1855 that was located too close to the edge of the eroding bluff. In 1888 a cast iron lighthouse was built, but this tower was not tall enough and was placed on top of a steel structure in 1912 raising its height to 74 feet (23 m) and light focal plane to 154 feet (47 m). The tower underwent restoration in 2005.
-wiki

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Screech Owl Enjoying The Warm Weather

Lake Park, Milwaukee Wisconsin

Screech owls or screech-owls are typical owls (Strigidae) belonging to the genus Megascops. Twenty-one living species are known at present, but new ones are frequently recognized and unknown ones are still being discovered on a regular basis, especially in the Andes. For most of the 20th century, this genus was merged with the Old World scops owls in Otus, but nowadays it is again considered separate based on a range of behavioral, biogeographical, morphological and DNA sequence data.

Screech owls are restricted to the Americas. Some species formerly placed with them are nowadays considered more distinct (see below for details). The common name "screech owl" is sometimes used for the not closely related barn owl as well.
-wiki

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Monday, April 11

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal
Kenosha #Wisconsin

The northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a North American bird in the genus Cardinalis; it is also known colloquially as the redbird or common cardinal. It can be found in southern Canada, through the eastern United States from Maine to Texas and south through Mexico. It is found in woodlands, gardens, shrublands, and swamps.

The northern cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21 cm (8.3 in). It has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black in the male and gray in the female. The male is a vibrant red, while the female is a dull reddish olive. The northern cardinal is mainly granivorous, but also feeds on insects and fruit. The male behaves territorially, marking out his territory with song. During courtship, the male feeds seed to the female beak-to-beak. A clutch of three to four eggs is laid, and two to four clutches are produced each year. It was once prized as a pet, but its sale as a cage bird was banned in the United States by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918.
-wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved

Saturday, April 9

He Went That Way

"He Went That Way"
Turkey Vulture (Turkey Buzzard)
Tichigan Wisconsin

The turkey vulture (Cathartes aura), also known in some North American regions as the turkey buzzard (or just buzzard), and in some areas of the Caribbean as the John crow or carrion crow, is a vulture that is the most widespread of the New World vultures. One of three species in the genus Cathartes of the family Cathartidae, the turkey vulture ranges from southern Canada to the southernmost tip of South America. It inhabits a variety of open and semi-open areas, including subtropical forests, shrublands, pastures, and deserts.
The turkey vulture is a scavenger and feeds almost exclusively on carrion. It finds its food using its keen eyes and sense of smell, flying low enough to detect the gases produced by the beginnings of the process of decay in dead animals
-Wiki

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Tuesday, April 5

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker
Bong Recreational Area, Wisconsin

The northern flicker (Colaptes auratus) is a medium-sized member of the woodpecker family. It is native to most of North America, parts of Central America, Cuba, the Cayman Islands, and is one of the few woodpecker species that migrate. There are over 100 common names for the northern flicker. Among them are: yellowhammer (as it's known as the state bird of Alabama, not to be confused with the Eurasian yellowhammer), clape, gaffer woodpecker, harry-wicket, heigh-ho, wake-up, walk-up, wick-up, yarrup, and gawker bird. Many of these names are attempts at imitating some of its calls.
-wiki

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Sunday, April 3

A Sign of Spring

American Goldfinch
Wisconsin

The American goldfinch (Spinus tristis), also known as the eastern goldfinch, is a small North American bird in the finch family. It is migratory, ranging from mid-Alberta to North Carolina during the breeding season, and from just south of the Canadian border to Mexico during the winter.
The only finch in its subfamily to undergo a complete molt, the American goldfinch displays sexual dimorphism in its coloration; the male is a vibrant yellow in the summer and an olive color during the winter, while the female is a dull yellow-brown shade which brightens only slightly during the summer. The male displays brightly colored plumage during the breeding season to attract a mate.
-wiki

C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved

Sunday, March 27

Eastern Bluebird

Bluebird
Bong Recreational Area Wildlife Refuge
Kenosha, Wisconsin

The bluebirds are a group of medium-sized, mostly insectivorous or omnivorous bird in the order of Passerines in the genus Sialia of the thrush family (Turdidae). Bluebirds are one of the few thrush genera in the Americas. They have blue, or blue and rose beige, plumage. Female birds are less brightly colored than males, although color patterns are similar and there is no noticeable difference in size between the two sexes.
Bluebirds are territorial and prefer open grassland with scattered trees. This is similar to the behaviour of many species of woodpecker. Bluebirds can typically produce between two and four broods during the spring and summer (March through August in the Northeastern United States). Males identify potential nest sites and try to attract prospective female mates to those nesting sites with special behaviors that include singing and flapping wings, and then placing some material in a nesting box or cavity. If the female accepts the male and the nesting site, she alone builds the nest and incubates the eggs.
-wiki

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