Sunday, September 25

Sunset After The Storm

Caledonia Wisconsin

Prints for sale at:
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NOTE: FINAL PRINTS WILL BE WATERMARK FREE.
(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved

Saturday, September 24

Northern Flicker in the Backyard

Northern Flicker in the Backyard 
Caledonia Wisconsin 

The northern flicker (Colaptes auratus) is a medium-sized member of the woodpecker family. It is native to most of North America, parts of Central America, Cuba, the Cayman Islands, and is one of the few woodpecker species that migrate. There are over 100 common names for the northern flicker. Among them are: yellowhammer (as it's known as the state bird of Alabama, not to be confused with the Eurasian yellowhammer), clape, gaffer woodpecker, harry-wicket, heigh-ho, wake-up, walk-up, wick-up, yarrup, and gawker bird. Many of these names are attempts at imitating some of its calls. 

Flickers may be observed in open habitats near trees, including woodlands, edges, yards, and parks. In the western United States, one can find them in mountain forests all the way up to treeline. Northern flickers generally nest in holes in trees like other woodpeckers. Occasionally, they have been found nesting in old, earthen burrows vacated by belted kingfishers or bank swallows. Both sexes help with nest excavation. 
-wiki 

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NOTE: FINAL PRINTS WILL BE WATERMARK FREE. 
(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved

Thursday, September 22

Sunrise

Sunrise
Kenosha Wisconsin

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NOTE: FINAL PRINTS WILL BE WATERMARK FREE.
(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved

Monday, September 19

Harvest Time

Harvest Time
Wisconsin

Prints for sale at
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NOTE: FINAL PRINTS WILL BE WATERMARK FREE. 
(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved

Sunday, September 18

Sunset Sundog

Sunset Sundog 
Racine Wisconsin 

Shot with a Canon 5Dmk III, 24-70mm lens. 

Prints for sale at:
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/sunset-sundog-ricky-l-jones.html?newartwork=true

NOTE: FINAL PRINTS WILL BE WATERMARK FREE. 
(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved

Saturday, September 17

American Goldfinch in the Backyard

Goldfinch in the Backyard
Caledonia Wisconsin

The American goldfinch (Spinus tristis), also known as the eastern goldfinch or "lightning bird," is a small North American bird in the finch family. It is migratory, ranging from mid-Alberta to North Carolina during the breeding season, and from just south of the Canadian border to Mexico during the winter.

The only finch in its subfamily to undergo a complete molt, the American goldfinch displays sexual dimorphism in its coloration; the male is a vibrant yellow in the summer and an olive color during the winter, while the female is a dull yellow-brown shade which brightens only slightly during the summer. The male displays brightly colored plumage during the breeding season to attract a mate.

The American goldfinch is a granivore and adapted for the consumption of seedheads, with a conical beak to remove the seeds and agile feet to grip the stems of seedheads while feeding. It is a social bird, and will gather in large flocks while feeding and migrating. It may behave territorially during nest construction, but this aggression is short-lived. Its breeding season is tied to the peak of food supply, beginning in late July, which is relatively late in the year for a finch. This species is generally monogamous, and produces one brood each year.
-wiki

Prints for sale at:
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NOTE: FINAL PRINTS WILL BE WATERMARK FREE.

(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved.

Friday, September 16

The Great Egret


Echo Lake, Burlington Wisconsin

The great egret (Ardea alba), also known as the common egret, large egret or (in the Old World) great white heron, is a large, widely distributed egret, with four subspecies found in Asia, Africa, America, and Europe. Distributed across most of the tropical and warmer temperate regions of the world, in southern Europe it is rather localized but more widely distributed in North America. It builds tree nests in colonies close to water. 

The great egret is generally a very successful species with a large and expanding range, occurring worldwide in temperate and tropical habitats. It is ubiquitous across the Sun Belt of the United States and in the Neotropics. In North America, large numbers of great egrets were killed around the end of the 19th century so that their plumes could be used to decorate hats. Numbers have since recovered as a result of conservation measures. Its range has expanded as far north as southern Canada. 
-wiki 

Prints for sale at:
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NOTE: FINAL PRINTS WILL BE WATERMARK FREE. 

(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved

Thursday, September 15

Harvest Moon At 99% Waxing Gibbous

Harvest Moon At 99% Waxing Gibbous
Caledonia Wisconsin

The "harvest moon" and "hunter's moon" are traditional terms for the full moons occurring during late summer and in the autumn, in the northern hemisphere usually in August, September and October respectively. The "harvest moon" is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox (22 or 23 September), and the "hunter's moon" is the one following it. The names are recorded from the early 18th century. OED for "harvest moon" cites a 1706 reference, and for "hunter's moon" a 1710 edition of The British Apollo, where the term is attributed to "the country people" (The Country People call this the Hunters-Moon.) The names became traditional in American folklore, where they are now often popularly attributed to the Native Americans. The Feast of the Hunters' Moon is a yearly festival in West Lafayette, Indiana, held in late September or early October each year since 1968.[10] In 2010, the Harvest moon occurred on the night of equinox itself (some 51⁄2 hours after the point of equinox) for the first time since 1991.
All full moons rise around the time of sunset. Because the moon moves eastward among the stars faster than the sun its meridian passage is delayed, causing it to rise later each day on average by about 50.47 minutes. The harvest moon and hunter's moon are unique because the time difference between moonrises on successive evenings is much shorter than average. The moon rises approximately 30 minutes later from one night to the next, as seen from about 40 degrees N or S latitude. (This is because a full moon in September appears to move not straight east but north-east in the sky.) Thus, there is no long period of darkness between sunset and moonrise for several days following the actual date of the full moon.
-wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved.

Monday, September 12

Sandhill Crane Pair

Sandhill Crane Pair
Horicon Marsh, Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin

The sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) is a species of large crane of North America and extreme northeastern Siberia. The common name of this bird refers to habitat like that at the Platte River, on the edge of Nebraska's Sandhills on the American Plains. This is the most important stopover area for the nominotypical subspecies, the lesser sandhill crane (Grus canadensis canadensis), with up to 450,000 of these birds migrating through annually.
Adults are gray overall; during breeding, their plumage is usually much worn and stained, particularly in the migratory populations, and looks nearly ochre. The average weight of the larger males is 4.57 kg (10.1 lb), while the average weight of females is 4.02 kg (8.9 lb), with a range of 2.7 to 6.7 kg (6.0 to 14.8 lb) across the subspecies.
These cranes frequently give a loud, trumpeting call that suggests a rolled "r" in the throat, and they can be heard from a long distance. Mated pairs of cranes engage in "unison calling". The cranes stand close together, calling in a synchronized and complex duet. The female makes two calls for every one from the male.
Sandhill cranes' large wingspans, typically 1.65 to 2.29 m (5 ft 5 in to 7 ft 6 in), make them very skilled soaring birds, similar in style to hawks and eagles. Using thermals to obtain lift, they can stay aloft for many hours, requiring only occasional flapping of their wings and consequently expending little energy. Migratory flocks contain hundreds of birds, and can create clear outlines of the normally invisible rising columns of air (thermals) they ride.
-wiki

NOTE: FINAL PRINTS WILL BE WATERMARK FREE.

Prints for sale at:
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(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved.

Tuesday, August 30

Great Egret

Great Egret
Horicon Marsh Wildlife Refuge

The great egret (Ardea alba), also known as the common egret, large egret or (in the Old World) great white heron, is a large, widely distributed egret, with four subspecies found in Asia, Africa, America, and Europe. Distributed across most of the tropical and warmer temperate regions of the world, in southern Europe it is rather localized but more widely distributed in North America. It builds tree nests in colonies close to water.

The great egret is generally a very successful species with a large and expanding range, occurring worldwide in temperate and tropical habitats. It is ubiquitous across the Sun Belt of the United States and in the Neotropics. In North America, large numbers of great egrets were killed around the end of the 19th century so that their plumes could be used to decorate hats. Numbers have since recovered as a result of conservation measures. Its range has expanded as far north as southern Canada.
-wiki

Prints for sale at:http://fineartamerica.com/featured/2-great-egret-ricky-l-jones.html?newartwork=true

NOTE: FINAL PRINTS WILL BE WATERMARK FREE.
(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2016 All rights reserved